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02/03/2015: Flick fake fines - Scammers sending fraudulent speeding fines

Scammers are at it again, sending fake speeding fines to consumers across NSW, the ACT, Victoria and Queensland, as well as several overseas countries, claiming to be from the NSW Office of State Revenue (OSR).

The NSW Commissioner for Fines Administration Tony Newbury is warning the public to flick the fake fines.

"Don't respond to scammers. Give them the flick," he said.

"This scam is designed to trick people into paying money or giving out personal and banking information such as bank account numbers, passwords and credit card numbers.

"Don't do it, don't respond or they could steal your money.

"Protect your identity and spread the warning to family and friends, neighbours and the vulnerable, so others don't fall for this scam.

"The NSW Office of State Revenue does not issue fines by email. They are either issued on the spot or by post.

"If you think you have a fine, check its validity at www.sdro.nsw.gov.au by entering the penalty or infringement number and offence date.

"You can also call OSR on 1300 138 118."

Mr Newbury said reports on the scam had been received from OSR staff and staff from Sydney businesses as well as consumers in Nambucca Heads, Nowra, Manly Vale, Cardiff, Pymble, New Lambton Heights, Jannali, Killara, Parramatta, Maclean, Moree, Redfern, Terrigal, Rozelle, Dural and Merewether.

"We've also had reports from New Zealand, Vietnam, Santorini and France, so this scam and impersonation of OSR is global," he said.

"Scam emails often look genuine and use what look to be genuine internet addresses.

"Scammers will copy logo and message formats.

"It is also common for scam emails to contain links to websites that are convincing fakes, with an address (URL) that is similar to but not the same as the real organisation's site.

"Never follow links in unsolicited emails or you run the risk of being infected with a virus."

Last updated: 02 March 2015